Driving in the UK with an EU Licence

Driving in the UK with an EU licence

Sometimes, the rules surrounding driving licences issued in different countries can seem confusing. However, while you might have encountered complicated legislation in the past, driving in the UK with an EU licence is really straightforward. We explain the rules below.

Don’t forget, though, your licence isn’t the only thing you’ll need to think about when driving in the UK. Make sure to take a look at our comprehensive guide to the differences between driving in Europe and the UK before you arrive.

The rules surrounding driving in the UK with an EU licence

Romanian driving licence

For standard EU car and motorcycle driving licences, you can drive in the UK either:

  • Until you’re 70 years of age
  • Or, for 3 years after becoming resident in the UK, if you become a resident when you’re aged 67 or over.

After this, your licence will expire and you’ll have to exchange it for a British one.

It’s also worth noting that this rule does not apply to drivers who got an EU licence by exchanging a licence from a non-EU country. If this applies to you, you’ll only be able to drive in the UK for a period of 12 months. You’ll then need to apply for a UK driving licence.

To double check that your licence will be valid for driving in the UK, you can use the government’s non-GB licence checking tool.

Exchanging your EU licence for a Great British one

Thankfully, if you’re a permanent resident of the UK and want to exchange your EU licence for a UK one, the process is very easy. Simply follow the steps on the government website.

It costs £43, and should take around 3 weeks.

Driving an EU-registered car in the UK

A left-hand drive Abarth 500
A left-hand drive Abarth 500

As well as being able to drive in the UK legally on your EU licence, it’s also possible to drive an EU-registered car in the UK, with some conditions.

Firstly, you have to be visiting the UK temporarily.

Secondly, the vehicle needs to be taxed and registered in its country of origin.

Finally, you can only use the vehicle for a period of up to 6 months. This could be all at once, or it could be multiple periods over the course of 12 months.

There are certain exceptions to these rules which mean that you could drive your EU-registered car in the UK for longer. To qualify for this extended period, you need to normally live outside the EUbe in the UK for a set period as a student or worker, and be claiming relief from VAT and duty.

If you need to drive your vehicle in the UK for more than 6 months of the year, or if you’re coming to the UK to become a resident here, you’ll need to tax and register your car with the relevant authorities.

Importing your car to the UK

Cars being transported

Importing your EU car to the UK can be somewhat of a complicated process. The procedure you need to follow is this:

Firstly, tell HMRC that your car has arrived in the UK.

Then, you may need to pay VAT and duty on the vehicle. HMRC will advise you on how much this will be.

Next, you’ll need to make sure your vehicle conforms to UK safety and environmental standards.

Once your vehicle has passed the relevant tests, you’ll be able to register and tax the vehicle with the DVLA. From this point onwards, you’ll need to display UK registration plates.

As you can tell, this could wind up being quite a lot of effort! So, unless you’ve got a passion for paperwork, it’s probably worth cutting your losses and buying a car here.

Do you know the penalties for using your phone while driving a car? Or have you always wondered why the waiting times for driving tests are so long? The PassMeFast Blog is your first port of call for advice on any aspects of driving law, driving tips, the driving practical test, and much more.

By Ben Scott

Ben's had a keen interest in all things driving from a very early age, so is perfectly placed to offer you all the advice you need. When he's not behind the wheel you'll either find him stuck deep into a novel or riding his bike.